Paul Steinhardt is selected as one of this year's winners of the John Scott Award...

Thursday, Nov 8, 2012

 

"For introducing the concept of quasicrystals, developing the theory describing their physical priorities, and for designing and conducting a successful search for the first natural quasicrystal." Please join us in congratulating him.

 

Board of Directors of City Trusts Honors Area Scientists with

John Scott Award

Media Contact:

Cathy Moss

Board of Directors of City Trusts

Communications Office

cmoss@willseye.org

267.733.9699-office

917.301.6773-cell

Philadelphia, PA-October 25, 2012- The Board of Directors of City Trusts announces that Virginia M. Y. Lee, PhD, MBA and John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, both Professors of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Paul J. Steinhardt, PhD, Albert Einstein Professor of Science and Director of the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science at Princeton University, will receive the 2012 John Scott Award. This honor is presented each year to "the most deserving" men and women whose inventions have contributed in some outstanding way to the "comfort, welfare and happiness" of mankind.

The award, which dates back to 1834, includes a $12,000 cash prize in addition to a copper medal and certificate. Previous recipients of the John Scott Award have included, Marie Curie (1921), Thomas Edison (1889), the Wright brothers (1925), Jonas Salk (1957), and Sir Alexander Fleming (1944). Last year’s recipients were Jenny Pickworth Glusker, DSc, and David E. Kuhl, MD. The 2011 award winners were credited with discoveries that opened up a new way of examining cellular metabolism in the human body.

Professors Lee and Trojanowski are receiving the award for their groundbreaking research into neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and ALS. Their work has focused on disease proteins forming unique clusters in the brain, and neuron dysfunction. Their research

has provided critical evidence for what new areas of research are needed in identifying targets and creating better treatments.

Paul Steinhardt, PhD, of Princeton University is receiving the award for introducing the concept of quasicrystals, developing the theory describing their physical priorities, and for designing and conducting a successful search for the first natural quasicrystal. Quasicrystals are a form of matter with symmetries forbidden for crystals. The search culminated with his organizing a geological expedition to one of the most remote places on Earth, across the Russian tundra, and in the discovery that the quasicrystals formed in a meteorite that formed over 4.5 billion years ago, making it one of the oldest materials to have formed in the solar system. The investigation of the samples is continuing with the goal of understanding the implications for the formation of the solar system and the planets.

"It is our great pleasure at the Board of Directors of City Trusts to honor these distinguished winners and applaud their extraordinary achievements in science and medicine," said the Honorable Ronald R. Donatucci, President of the Board of Directors of City Trusts and Chairman of the John Scott Award Advisory Committee. "Clearly, as world renowned leaders in their field, they have epitomized the purpose of the award," continued Donatucci.

The donor, John Scott, was an Edinburgh chemist, who in the early 1800s set up a fund in Philadelphia to award "ingenious men or women who make useful inventions." The Board of Directors of City Trusts is charged with the administration of 115 trusts left to the City of Philadelphia for charitable purposes including the one from which the John Scott Award is derived.

The John Scott Award ceremony and reception will take place at 5:30 PM on Friday, November 16, 2012 in Benjamin Franklin Hall at the American Philosophical Society, 427 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. All three recipients will be available for interviews.