Special Joint Gravity Group and Gravity Initiative Seminar: Neil Cornish|Montana State| "Gravitational Wave Astronomy: Where we are at, and What’s next”

Following the first detection of a binary black hole merger in 2015, the number of gravitational wave events has grown to almost one hundred, including binary neutron star mergers and mixed black hole, neutron star mergers. Going forward, the next few years should bring a wealth of new discoveries, including several more neutron star mergers with electromagnetic counterparts, and the first detection of gravitational waves in the nano-Hertz band using pulsar timing arrays, including the possible detection of signals from individual super massive black hole binaries. Looking further ahead to the next decade, future space based and new ground based instruments will explore the entire Universe, opening up the possibility of detecting rare, exotic events that have yet to be imagined.