Events Archive

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Michelle Simmons, University of New South Wales, Australia, "Atomic Qubits in Silicon"
Thu, Nov 14, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Building a quantum computer in the highly manufacturable material silicon offers many advantages. Phosphorus atom qubits in silicon in particular have demonstrated extremely long (up to 35 s) coherence times with >99.9% fidelity. Their small size, combined with the magnetically quiet environment of isotopically pure silicon, make them…

A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Sheperd S. Doeleman, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, "The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole"
Thu, Nov 7, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes. Observing at mm radio wavelengths enables detection of photons that originate from deep within the gravitational potential well of the…

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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Allan H. MacDonald, University of Texas at Austin, "Magic Angle Twisted Bilayer Graphene" Jadwin A10
Thu, Oct 3, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Moiré patterns are ubiquitous in layered van der Waals materials and can now be fabricated with considerable control by combining mechanical exfoliation of van der Waals layers with tear and stack device fabrication techniques.  I will explain why the electronic and optical properties of two-dimensional semiconductors and semimetals are…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Adam Burrows, Princeton University, "Supernova Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions" Jadwin A10
Thu, Sep 26, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Using our state-of-the-art code Fornax we have simulated the collapse and explosion of the cores of many massive-star models in three spatial dimensions. This is the most comprehensive set of realistic 3D core-collapse supernova simulations yet performed and has provided very important insights into the mechanism and character of this 50-year…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Gerard 't Hooft, Utrecht University, "The Quantum Black Hole: How Exotic Physics May Enter"
Thu, Sep 19, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Quantising a black hole can be done starting with conventional physics. We just assume matter to keep the form of point particles until they come close to the horizon. The gravitational back reaction of these particles generates a novel relation between particles going in and particles going out, enabling us to transform in-going particles into…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Silviu Pufu, Princeton University "Conformal Field Theory: From Boiling Water to Quantum Gravity"
Thu, Sep 12, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Conformal Field Theory (CFT) is a framework used to describe physical systems with no intrinsic length or energy scales.  CFTs have wide applicability across theoretical physics, ranging from critical points in the phase diagrams of water or magnetic materials to the low-energy dynamics of extended objects in string theory.  In this talk, I…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Lawrence Sulak, Boston University, “Discovering the Electro-Weak Force, Seeing a Supernova Explode, Peering Inside the Sun, & Watching Neutrinos Oscillate”
Thu, May 2, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Cosmological hypotheses and oracular dreams of grandly unifying all the forces of nature foretold: neutrinos might weigh a tiny bit, those elusive particles might blow up stars, and the protons (and your ashes) would transform into light in 1029 years.  Indeed, that man can live to 100, without the radioactivity in his bones killing him,…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Pupa Gilbert, University of Wisconsin-Madison,"How Organisms Build Crystals"
Thu, Apr 18, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Crystalline biominerals cost energy but provide the diverse organism making them with scaffolding, shielding, locomotion, mastication, gravity and magnetic field sensing, etc. How these crystals are formed reveals how living organisms harness the laws of physics and chemistry for their evolutionary advantage, but also because it can teach us…

A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Hirosi Ooguri, Caltech, "Constraints on Quantum Gravity"
Thu, Apr 11, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Superstring theory is our best candidate for the ultimate unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics. Although predictions of the theory are typically at extremely high energy and out of reach of current experiments and observations, several non-trivial constraints on its low energy effective theory have been found. Because of the…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Marta Volonteri, IAP, "Massive Black Hole Binaries in the Cosmos" Jadwin A10
Thu, Apr 4, 2019, 4:00 pm5:00 pm

Massive black holes weighing from a few tens of thousands to tens of billions of solar masses inhabit the centers of today’s galaxies, including our own Milky Way. Massive black holes also shone as quasars in the past, with the earliest detected a mere billion years after the Big Bang. Along cosmic time, encounters between galaxies hosting…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series, Shinsei Ryu, University of Chicago, "Topology, Entanglement, and Time-Reversal Symmetry in Quantum Many-Body Physics"
Thu, Mar 14, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Time-reversal symmetry is one of fundamental symmetries that can present in many quantum mechanical systems. It plays an important role in many-body quantum systems, as demonstrated, for example, in the physics of topological insulators. In this talk, I will discuss topology and quantum entanglement protected and detected by time-reversal…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Anthony Leggett, University of Illinois, "Why I don't believe that Quantum Mechanics is the Whole Truth", Jadwin A10
Thu, Feb 28, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Not long after the birth of quantum mechanics nearly a century ago, Erwin Schroedinger pointed out, in his famous "Cat" paper, the difficulty which arises if we assume that the theory gives a complete account of the world up to and including our observations of it. This difficulty, known as the measurement, or better realization, problem, has…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Lenka Zdeborová, Institute of Theoretical Physics in CEA Saclay, France, "Statistical Physics of Computational Problems" Jadwin A10
Thu, Feb 21, 2019, 4:00 pm5:00 pm

What are the problems we can solve using a computer? is one of the very fundamental question in science. We will describe how do we use statistical physics to address this question. We will discuss what insights does physics bring to the field of algorithmic hardness and how is this insight used to develop better algorithms. We will describe…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Bonnie Fleming, Yale University,“Nu Measurements, New Physics: Short and Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments at Fermilab”, Jadwin A10
Thu, Feb 7, 2019, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

From "desperate remedies" to "missing energy", the three neutrinos, the tiniest building blocks of matter, have been elusive for most of their known lives.  Only in the last 20 years have we convinced ourselves that neutrinos, like the other building blocks of matter, have mass.   This evidence has raised more questions than it has answered and…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Daniel Segre, Boston University, "Metabolic Networks from Genomes to Ecosystems" Jadwin A10
Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 4:30 pm4:30 pm

Microbial ecosystems and their metabolic activity play a fundamental but poorly understood role at multiple scales, from human health to biogeochemical cycles. In fact, metabolism, in addition to being the “engine” of every living cell, mediates competition and cross-feeding between different species, and dictates how cells interact with their…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series:Xie Chen, Caltech, "Fracton Order: From Foliated Manifold to Quantum Hard Drive", Jadwin A10
Thu, Dec 6, 2018, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

One major open problem in quantum information theory is how to build a quantum hard drive, i.e. a quantum mechanical system that can store quantum information reliably for a very long time without active error correction. No completely satisfying solution to this problem has been found, but in the search for possibilities a whole new class of…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series:Nai Phuan Ong, Princeton University, "The Chiral Anomaly in Dirac Semimetals" Jadwin A10
Thu, Nov 29, 2018, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

I will talk about recent experiments on the chiral anomaly in Dirac semimetals. In field theory, Dirac fermions of zero mass must segregate into left- and right-handed populations that do not ever mix. In this limit, chiral symmetry (handedness) is a global symmetry of the Lagrangian. However, quantum effects induced by coupling to a vector…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Gregory Falkovich, Weizmann Institute of Science, "Wonders of Viscous Electronics" Jadwin A10
Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

Quantum-critical strongly correlated systems feature universal collision-dominated collective transport. Viscous electronics is an emerging field dealing with systems in which strongly interacting electrons flow like a fluid. Such flows have some remarkable properties never seen before. I shall describe recent theoretical and experimental works…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Hugo Duminil Copin, IHES, "Probabilistic Approach to Critical Phenomena in Statistical Physics" Jadwin A10
Thu, Nov 8, 2018, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

The talk will present some of the recent progress in mathematical studies of critical phenomena of classical statistical mechanical systems. Through the relation of quantum systems to classical  systems in d+1 dimensions, some of these new results also yield new understanding of the ground states of a class of quantum spin chains with a…

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A free lecture open to the public.
Hamilton Colloquium Series: Timothy Koeth, University of Maryland "The Physicists in the Basement of the High Castle" Jadwin A10
Thu, Oct 11, 2018, 4:00 pm4:00 pm

1944 saw the height of the United States Manhattan Project efforts which was distributed between Los Alamos New Mexico, Oak Ridge Tennessee, and Hanford Washington.  Since the Manhattan Project was spurred by the fear that Germany was building her own nuclear weapons, Allied anxiety continuously pondered the Nazi atomic progress. As…

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A free lecture open to the public.