Events Archive

Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Sebastian Seung, Princeton University: "Structure and function of the retina"

Thu, Feb 11, 2016, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The importance of determining and interpreting the structures of atoms, crystals, and proteins was established long ago. I will discuss current efforts to extend this paradigm to the brain, focusing on new discoveries concerning the structure of the retina gained through 3D electron microscopy, computer vision, and crowdsourcing.

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Steven Tobias, University of Leeds (UK), "Order from Chaos: From the Solar Cycle to the Jets on Jupiter"

Thu, Dec 10, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The eleven year solar activity cycle is a remarkable example of regular behavior emerging from an extremely turbulent system. The jets on Jupiter sit unmoving on a sea of turbulent eddies. Astrophysical phenomena often display organization on spatial and temporal scales much larger than the turbulent processes that drive them.

Hamilton Colloquium: Curtis Callan, Princeton, "What can theoretical physics do for biology (and vice-versa)? Reflections of an ex-particle theorist."

Thu, Nov 19, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Living matter obeys the laws of physics, and the principles and methods of theoretical physics ought to find useful application in many areas of biology. This truism is becoming ever more relevant with the rapid growth of the ability of biological experiments to produce comprehensive quantitative data.

Hamilton Colloquium - Bill Jones, Princeton, "The Universe as a Lab for Fundamental Physics: Results from Spider and future suborbital observations"

Thu, Oct 29, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

I will describe our recent cosmological results from observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background, including a status report on the recent flight of the Spider experiment, a balloon borne CMB polarimeter.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Neil Turok, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Canada, "Big Bang: Bounce or Beginning?"

Thu, Oct 22, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

We are fortunate to live at a time when questions about the origin and future of the universe are becoming accessible to scientific inquiry, primarily through observational advances but also through the development of new theoretical ideas.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Laura Baudis, University of Zurich, "Direct detection of dark matter in the Milky Way"

Thu, Oct 15, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Cosmological observations and the dynamics of the Milky Way provide strong evidence for an invisible and dominant mass component that so far reveals its presence only by its gravitational interaction.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Sheldon Stone, Syracuse University, "Pentaquarks and Tetraquarks at LHCb"

Thu, Oct 8, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

I will discuss the discovery of two pentaquark states both decaying into a J/ψ meson and a proton. The decay mode defines the quark content as c cbar, u, u, d, and thus are called charmonium pentaquarks. These exotic structures are found in Λb→J/ψ K- p decays using a full amplitude analysis using 7 and 8 TeV pp collisions from 3/fb of data...

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Alexander Polyakov, Princeton University, "In praise of quantum field theory"

Thu, Oct 1, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Quantum field theory provides a universal language for very different areas of physics. I will try to demonstrate this by briefly discussing some fundamental problems, both solved and unsolved.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Gil Refael, CalTech, "Floquet quantum states: topological transitions, steady states, and suprising implications"

Thu, Sep 24, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Recent work has shown that manipulating a quantum system using a periodic drive provides a new means for externally controlling it. Such a periodic drive can give rise to topological states in trivial quantum wells, bulk semiconductors, and even in graphene; and it can also turn a quantum wire into a system which could have Majorana states - of...

Hamilton Colloquium Series- Pasquale Blasi, INAF-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Florence,Italy,"Cosmic Rays: a journey from accelerators to Earth"

Thu, Apr 16, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The bulk of cosmic rays originate in the Milky Way, most likely in supernova explosions. I will discuss the physics aspects of the interaction between charged particles and the environment that are at the very basis of both particle acceleration and propagation throughout the Galaxy and beyond.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Pasquale Blasi, INAF – Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Florence, Italy “Cosmic Rays: A journey from accelerators to Earth”

Thu, Apr 16, 2015, 4:00 pm

The bulk of cosmic rays originate in the Milky Way, most likely in supernova explosions. I will discuss the physics aspects of the interaction between charged particles and the environment that are at the very basis of both particle acceleration and propagation throughout the Galaxy and beyond.

Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Cindy Regal, University of Colorado-Boulder, "Interferometry in a strong light"

Thu, Apr 2, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The best rulers are made from light! From gravitational wave interferometers to surface diagnostics, to the definition of the meter, optical interferometry is at the heart of precise measurement.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Ali Yazdani, Princeton University, "Spotting the elusive Majorana under the microscope"

Thu, Mar 26, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

There has been considerable interest in creating condensed matter systems that host Majorana fermions. This goal is motivated in part by Majorana fermions’ potential use in topological qubits to perform fault-tolerant computation aided by their non-Abelian characteristics.

Hamilton Colloquium Series-Per Helander, Max-Planck Ins.Plasma Physics,"Theory of non-symmetric plasma confinement and a new large physics experiment

Thu, Mar 12, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The Princeton astrophysicist Lyman Spitzer famously figured out how a magnetic field can be used to confine a fully ionized plasma in steady state. His solution, the so-called stellarator, involves a counterintuitive twisting of the field without employing an electric current, and is mathematically related to the Berry phase in quantum...

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Charles Kane, University of Pennsylvania, "Topological Boundary Modes from Quantum Electronics to Classical Mechanics"

Thu, Feb 19, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Over the past several years, our understanding of topological electronic phases of matter has advanced dramatically. A paradigm that has emerged is that insulating electronic states with an energy gap fall into distinct topological classes.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Zheng-Tian Lu, ANL, U. Chicago, "Atom Trap, Krypton-81, and Global Groundwater"

Thu, Feb 12, 2015, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr is the ideal tracer for water and ice with ages of 10^5 – 10^6 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating, a concept pursued over the past five decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is finally available to the earth science community at large.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Zheng-Tian Lu, University of Chicago “Atom Trap, Krypton-81, and Global Groundwater”

Thu, Feb 12, 2015 (All day)

The long-lived noble-gas isotope 81Kr is the ideal tracer for water and ice with ages of 105 – 106 years, a range beyond the reach of 14C. 81Kr-dating, a concept pursued over the past five decades by numerous laboratories employing a variety of techniques, is finally available to the earth science community at large.

Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Yifang Wang, Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing): "Daya Bay neutrino experiment and the future"

Thu, Dec 4, 2014, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

Recently reactor neutrino experiments have made important contributions to the neutrino oscillation. I will introduce the Daya Bay experiment which observed for the first time the neutrino mixing angle θ13 with a statistical significance of 5.2 σ. The concept of the experiment, the detector construction and data analysis will be described.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - E.K.U. Gross, Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Germany. (Please see title below.)

Thu, Nov 20, 2014, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

"How to make the Born-Oppenheimer approximation exact: A fresh look at potential energy surfaces and Berry phases in the vicinity of strong non-adiabatic couplings" The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is among the most fundamental ingredients of modern condensed matter physics.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Eva Halkiadakis, Rutgers University, "Searching for Supersymmetry with CMS Experiement at the LHC"

Thu, Nov 13, 2014, 4:30 pm to 6:00 pm

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has had a successful Run I. It provided the highest energy proton collisions to-date to the experiments, at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. In 2012, the observation of a new Higgs-like boson was announced to the world. There is also an extensive program at the LHC to search for physics beyond the Standard Model...

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