Events Archive

Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, MIT; “Magic Angle Graphene: a New Platform for Strongly Correlated Physics”

Thu, Mar 1, 2018, 4:00 pm

The understanding of strongly correlated quantum matter has challenged physicists for decades. Such difficulties have stimulated new research paradigms, such as ultra-cold atom lattices for simulating quantum materials. In this talk I will present a new platform to investigate strongly correlated physics, based on graphene moiré superlattices...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: L. Mahadevan, Harvard University; "Motifs in morphogenesis"

Thu, Feb 22, 2018, 4:00 pm

How is living matter organized in space and time during multicellular morphogenesis? A comparative view across animals and plants suggests that the answer may lie in reusing just a few geometric and topological organ-sculpting motifs. Using examples, I will discuss the qualitative and quantitative basis for three of these motifs: elongation,...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Xiaoliang Qi, Stanford; "The entanglement glue for spacetime"

Thu, Feb 15, 2018, 4:00 pm

Einstein’s theory of general relativity tells us that gravity comes from curved space-time geometry. The space-time is like a plastic membrane which we can stretch with our energy and momentum. But what is this membrane made of? What glues the spacetime together?

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Marek Karliner, Tel Aviv University; "The social life of heavy quarks"

Thu, Feb 8, 2018, 4:00 pm

I will discuss recent developments regarding new types of hadrons involving heavy quarks: hadronic molecules, doubly heavy baryons, stable tetraquarks and others. I will also explain how the discovery of the doubly heavy baryon leads to quark-level analogue of nuclear fusion, with energy release per reaction an order of magnitude greater than...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Jessie Shelton, University of Ilinois (Urbana-Champaign); "The Higgs portal onto the dark universe" (Jadwin A07)

Thu, Jan 18, 2018, 4:00 pm

The Standard Model of particle physics has been a smashing success at the high energies newly tested at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC's discovery of the Higgs boson completes the Standard Model and bears out one of its most puzzling predictions.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Eric Siggia, Rockefeller University, “Exploring embryonic patterning with colonies of human embryonic stem cells”

Thu, Dec 14, 2017, 4:00 pm

Embryology at the beginning of the 21st century finds itself in a situation similar to neurobiology; the behavior of the component pieces is understood in some detail, but how they self-assemble to become life is still very hazy.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Tilman Pfau, Universität Stuttgart, "Dipolar quantum gases and liquids"

Thu, Dec 7, 2017, 4:00 pm

Dipolar interactions are fundamentally different from the usual van der Waals forces in real gases. Besides the anisotropy the dipolar interaction is nonlocal and as such allows for self organized structure formation. Candidates for dipolar species are polar molecules, Rydberg atoms and magnetic atoms.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Gilles Tarjus, LPTMC, CNRS/University Pierre and Marie Curie, France; "The glass transition: a theoretical perspective"

Thu, Nov 30, 2017, 4:00 pm

When cooled fast enough to avoid crystallization, a liquid becomes increasingly viscous and eventually forms a glass. This “glass transition,” one of the oldest unsolved problems in condensed-matter physics, gives rise to a wide diversity of views. Accordingly, there is a lack of agreement on which would be the most profitable theoretical...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.

Hamilton Colloquium Series: B. Andrei Bernevig, Princeton University, "Topological Quantum Chemistry"

Thu, Nov 9, 2017, 4:00 pm

The fields of Physics and Chemistry approach electronic band structure differently. Physicists develop an understanding of bands in momentum space, while chemists look at the bonding of orbitals in real space.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Juan Maldacena, Institute for Advanced Study, "Quantum mechanics and the geometry of spacetime"

Thu, Oct 26, 2017, 4:00 pm

Black holes are fascinating objects which pose interesting puzzles for quantum physics. Studying these puzzles we are led to quantum mechanical models that describe special black holes as seen from the outside. Extrapolating from these descriptions we conclude that entanglement can create geometric connections or wormholes.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Jason Petta, Princeton University, "Towards a Quantum Internet with Electron Spins"

Thu, Oct 19, 2017, 4:00 pm

Tremendous progress has been achieved in the coherent control of single quantum states (single charges, phonons, photons, and spins). At the frontier of quantum information science are efforts to hybridize different quantum degrees of freedom.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Ned Wingreen, Princeton University, "Protein phase transitions in and out of cells"

Thu, Oct 12, 2017, 4:00 pm

Biologists have recently come to appreciate that eukaryotic cells are home to a multiplicity of non-membrane bound compartments, many of which form and dissolve as needed for the cell to function. These dynamical “liquid droplets” enable many central cellular functions – from ribosome assembly, to RNA regulation and storage, to signaling and...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Eve Ostriker, Princeton University, "The Physics of Star Formation Feedback and Self-Regulation"

Thu, Oct 5, 2017, 4:00 pm

At all scales in the Universe, gravity wages a perpetual campaign to compress baryons to ever higher densities.  Cosmic filaments, galaxies, interstellar clouds, and individual stars represent successive failures in the struggle against gravity.  But at the bottom of the scale, stars fight back.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Simone Giombi, Princeton University, "Higher-spin gravity and conformal field theory"

Thu, Sep 28, 2017, 4:00 pm

Higher-spin gravity is a generalization of Einstein's general relativity, which involves towers of interacting massless fields of arbitrarily high spin. It has an infinite dimensional higher-spin gauge symmetry, and can be consistently constructed in the presence of a non-zero cosmological constant.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series - James Olsen, Princeton University; "LHC at 13 TeV”

Thu, Apr 27, 2017, 4:00 pm

In 2015 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) resumed proton collisions at a new record energy of 13 trillion electronvolts (13 TeV) and doubled the interaction rate achieved in the 2010-2012 run.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Philip Kim, Harvard University; "Unusual quasiparticle correlation in graphene"

Thu, Apr 13, 2017, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Interactions between particles in quantum many-body systems can lead to a collective behavior. In a condensed matter system consisting of weakly interacting particles, a propagating particle interacting with its surroundings can be viewed as a ‘dressed’ quasiparticle with renormalized mass and other dynamic properties.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Tomasz Skwarnicki, Syracuse University; "Heavy flavor spectroscopy at LHCb"

Thu, Apr 6, 2017, 4:00 pm

Hadrons with heavy quarks play a special role in studies of structures created by strong interactions.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Jonathan Simon, University of Chicago; “Building quantum matter from light: from topological photonics to polariton blockade”

Thu, Mar 9, 2017, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

I will present our recent work building matter from light, beginning with a realization of Landau levels for optical photons in a non-planar (twisted) optical resonator and studying the impact of placing these photons in curved space.

Hamilton Colloquium Series - Jo Dunkley, Professor of Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University; "Neutrino physics from the polarized microwave background"

Thu, Mar 2, 2017, 4:00 pm

Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation have taught us a great deal about the origins and content of the universe, but there is still more information to be extracted.

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Yakir Aharonov, Chapman University, and Professor Emeritus, Tel Aviv University; “Non-local phenomena in Quantum Mechanics"

Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm

I discuss in my talk a reformulation of quantum mechanics in which each quantum system at any time is described by two Hilbert space vectors rather than one. One of the vectors propagates from a past boundary condition towards the present and the other propagates back to the present from a future boundary condition.

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