Events Archive

Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Marta Volonteri, IAP, "Massive Black Hole Binaries in the Cosmos" Jadwin A10

Thu, Apr 4, 2019, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

Massive black holes weighing from a few tens of thousands to tens of billions of solar masses inhabit the centers of today’s galaxies, including our own Milky Way. Massive black holes also shone as quasars in the past, with the earliest detected a mere billion years after the Big Bang.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Shinsei Ryu, University of Chicago, "Topology, Entanglement, and Time-Reversal Symmetry in Quantum Many-Body Physics"

Thu, Mar 14, 2019, 4:00 pm

Time-reversal symmetry is one of fundamental symmetries that can present in many quantum mechanical systems. It plays an important role in many-body quantum systems, as demonstrated, for example, in the physics of topological insulators. In this talk, I will discuss topology and quantum entanglement protected and detected by time-reversal...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Anthony Leggett, University of Illinois, "Why I don't believe that Quantum Mechanics is the Whole Truth", Jadwin A10

Thu, Feb 28, 2019, 4:00 pm

Not long after the birth of quantum mechanics nearly a century ago, Erwin Schroedinger pointed out, in his famous "Cat" paper, the difficulty which arises if we assume that the theory gives a complete account of the world up to and including our observations of it.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Lenka Zdeborová, Institute of Theoretical Physics in CEA Saclay, France, "Statistical Physics of Computational Problems" Jadwin A10

Thu, Feb 21, 2019, 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm

What are the problems we can solve using a computer? is one of the very fundamental question in science. We will describe how do we use statistical physics to address this question. We will discuss what insights does physics bring to the field of algorithmic hardness and how is this insight used to develop better algorithms.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Bonnie Fleming, Yale University,“Nu Measurements, New Physics: Short and Long Baseline Neutrino Experiments at Fermilab”, Jadwin A10

Thu, Feb 7, 2019, 4:00 pm

From "desperate remedies" to "missing energy", the three neutrinos, the tiniest building blocks of matter, have been elusive for most of their known lives.  Only in the last 20 years have we convinced ourselves that neutrinos, like the other building blocks of matter, have mass.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Daniel Segre, Boston University, "Metabolic Networks from Genomes to Ecosystems" Jadwin A10

Thu, Dec 13, 2018, 4:30 pm

Microbial ecosystems and their metabolic activity play a fundamental but poorly understood role at multiple scales, from human health to biogeochemical cycles. In fact, metabolism, in addition to being the “engine” of every living cell, mediates competition and cross-feeding between different species, and dictates how cells interact with their...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series:Xie Chen, Caltech, "Fracton Order: From Foliated Manifold to Quantum Hard Drive", Jadwin A10

Thu, Dec 6, 2018, 4:00 pm

One major open problem in quantum information theory is how to build a quantum hard drive, i.e. a quantum mechanical system that can store quantum information reliably for a very long time without active error correction.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series:Nai Phuan Ong, Princeton University, "The Chiral Anomaly in Dirac Semimetals" Jadwin A10

Thu, Nov 29, 2018, 4:00 pm

I will talk about recent experiments on the chiral anomaly in Dirac semimetals. In field theory, Dirac fermions of zero mass must segregate into left- and right-handed populations that do not ever mix. In this limit, chiral symmetry (handedness) is a global symmetry of the Lagrangian. However, quantum effects induced by coupling to a vector...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Gregory Falkovich, Weizmann Institute of Science, "Wonders of Viscous Electronics" Jadwin A10

Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 4:00 pm

Quantum-critical strongly correlated systems feature universal collision-dominated collective transport. Viscous electronics is an emerging field dealing with systems in which strongly interacting electrons flow like a fluid. Such flows have some remarkable properties never seen before.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Hugo Duminil Copin, IHES, "Probabilistic Approach to Critical Phenomena in Statistical Physics" Jadwin A10

Thu, Nov 8, 2018, 4:00 pm

The talk will present some of the recent progress in mathematical studies of critical phenomena of classical statistical mechanical systems.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Timothy Koeth, University of Maryland "The Physicists in the Basement of the High Castle" Jadwin A10

Thu, Oct 11, 2018, 4:00 pm

1944 saw the height of the United States Manhattan Project efforts which was distributed between Los Alamos New Mexico, Oak Ridge Tennessee, and Hanford Washington.  Since the Manhattan Project was spurred by the fear that Germany was building her own nuclear weapons, Allied anxiety continuously pondered the Nazi atomic progress....

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: David Poland, Yale University, "Critical Phenomena and the Conformal Bootstrap" Jadwin A10

Thu, Oct 4, 2018, 4:00 pm

From critical phenomena to quantum gravity, conformal field theories describe the universal scale-invariant structures that lie at the heart of theoretical physics. The conformal bootstrap is the powerful idea, dating back to the 70’s, that one can use fundamental consistency conditions to constrain, solve, and map out the space of conformal ...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Mariangela Lisanti, Princeton University, "Dark Matter in Disequilibrium" Jadwin A10

Thu, Sep 27, 2018, 4:00 pm

The Gaia mission is in the process of mapping nearly 1% of the Milky Way’s stars.  This data set is unprecedented and provides a unique view into the formation history of our Galaxy and its associated dark matter halo.  I will review results based on the most recent Gaia data release, which demonstrate that the inner Galaxy is dominated...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Waseem Bakr, Princeton University, "Quantum Gas Microscopy of Strongly Interacting Fermions in Optical Lattices" Jadwin A10

Thu, Sep 20, 2018, 4:00 pm

Ultracold fermions in optical lattices provide a clean physical realization of the celebrated Fermi-Hubbard model of condensed matter, a minimal model believed to contain the essential ingredients for high-temperature superconductivity.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: David Gross, Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, UC-Santa Barbara; "The Future of Particle Physics"

Thu, May 3, 2018, 4:00 pm

The standard model of particle physics is approaching the half-century mark. I shall discuss what we have learned and where we might be headed.

David Gross is the Chancellor's Chair and Professor of Theoretical Physics at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UC-Santa Barbara and a Nobel Laureate in Physics, 2004.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.

Hamilton Colloquium Series: David Nygren, U. Texas, Arlington, “The matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe and the search for neutrinoless double beta decay”

Thu, Apr 26, 2018, 4:00 pm

Why is the universe composed only of matter, with negligible anti-matter? Is the neutrino its own anti-particle? These two seemingly disparate questions may be linked through leptogenesis–a theory which postulates massive neutrinos that break matter-antimatter asymmetry and could yield the universe we observe, inhabit and explore today...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Kater Murch, Washington U., St. Louis; "Realizing a quantum Maxwell’s demon with superconducting circuits"

Thu, Apr 19, 2018, 4:00 pm
Thermodynamics is a field of physics that describes quantities such as heat and work and their relationship to entropy and temperature. Originally developed as a theory to optimize the efficiency of heat engines, two extensions of thermodynamics in the last century advanced the theory to the point at which quantum mechanics should be incorporated.
Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Donald R. Hamilton Lecture: Kip Thorne, Caltech, “Exploring the Universe with Gravitational Waves: From the Big Bang to Black Holes and Colliding Stars”

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Avi Wigderson, Institute for Advanced Study, "The Brascamp-Lieb inequalities: structure and algorithms"

Thu, Apr 5, 2018, 4:00 pm

The celebrated Brascamp-Lieb (BL) inequalities, and their reverse form of Barthe, is a powerful framework which unifies and generalizes many important inequalities in analysis,
convex geometry and information theory.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series: Ila Fiete, University of Texas at Austin, "Neural circuitry for navigation in metric spaces"

Thu, Mar 15, 2018, 4:00 pm

I will review key computational aspects of navigation and describe the brain’s circuits that underlie it. These circuits contain neurons with remarkable responses to spatial variables, including head direction cells, grid cells, and place cells.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

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