Events Archive

Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Subir Sachdev, Harvard University, "Planckian Metals and Black Holes"

Thu, Nov 11, 2021, 4:00 pm

Many modern materials feature a “Planckian metal”: a phase of electronic quantum matter without quasiparticle excitations, and relaxation in a time of order Planck's constant divided by the absolute temperature.

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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Eliot Quataert, Princeton University, “Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves and the Origin of the Elements”

Thu, Nov 4, 2021, 4:00 pm

The discovery of compact object mergers by LIGO has opened up a new window into the Universe’s most exotic objects, neutron stars and black holes. Maximizing the scientific return of this new window requires connecting gravitational wave detections to the wealth of electromagnetic data on similar...

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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Howard Stone, Princeton University, "Classical fluid mechanics confronts modern research questions: Virus transport, a novel similarity solution, and an N-body problem"

Thu, Oct 7, 2021, 4:00 pm

I will provide a brief overview of recent projects in my group where we identify new analytical and physical features of flows common to modern research questions.

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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Cumrun Vafa, Harvard University, "The String Landscape and the Swampland"

Thu, Nov 19, 2020, 12:15 pm

String theory landscape of vacua point to new consistency conditions that a quantum gravitational system must satisfy.  There are only a small number of quantum field theories that satisfy these conditions and all the rest belong to the `Swampland' which cannot be consistently coupled to gravity.  In this talk I review some of these conditions...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Charles M Marcus, NBI, "The Search for Fractional Statistics"

Thu, Nov 12, 2020, 12:00 pm

Panel discussion with Duncan Haldane (Princeton), Michael Manfra (Purdue) and Gwendal Feve (ENS)

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Monika Schleier-Smith, Stanford University, "Choreographing Quantum Spin Dynamics with Light"

Thu, Nov 5, 2020, 12:00 pm

The power of quantum information lies in its capacity to be non-local, encoded in correlations among two, three, or many entangled particles.  Yet our ability to produce, understand, and exploit such correlations is hampered by the fact that the interactions between particles and ordinarily local.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Andrei Beloborodov, Columbia University, "Explosive Neutron Stars"

Thu, Oct 29, 2020, 12:00 pm

Neutron stars are by far the strongest known magnets in the universe. Some of them (called magnetars) generate explosions by suddenly dissipating magnetic energy with a rate up to $10^{47}$ erg/s. These magnetic explosions emit giant gamma-ray flares observed in our and neighboring galaxies.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Jenny Greene, Princeton University, "Exploring Supermassive Black Holes"

Thu, Oct 15, 2020, 12:15 pm

Panel Discussion with Suvi Gezari, Brian Metzger and Marta Volonteri

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Leonid Mirny, MIT, "Physics of Your Chromosomes" via Zoom

Thu, Oct 1, 2020, 12:00 pm

DNA of the human genome is 2 meters long and is folded into chromosomes that fit in a 10-micron cellular nucleus. I will discuss physical principles that govern folding of long DNA molecules, including phase separation, topological effects in polymer systems, and non-equilibrium phenomena.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Luis Fernando Alday, Oxford University, "Quantum Scattering Amplitudes in AdS/CFT"

Thu, Feb 20, 2020, 4:00 pm

The AdS/CFT correspondence maps correlators of local operators in a conformal field theory to scattering amplitudes in a gravitational/string theory on curved space-time. The study of such amplitudes is incredibly hard and has mostly been done in a certain classical limit. We show how modern analytic bootstrap techniques allow us to go much...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Ricard Alert, Princeton University, "The Physics of Collective Cell Migration"

Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 4:00 pm

Cells in our body move in groups during development, wound healing, and tumor spreading. Bacterial cells also coordinate their motion to aggregate into biofilms, to feed cooperatively, and to form fruiting bodies.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Thierry Mora,Ecole Normale Supérieure de Paris, "Diversity and Memory in Self-Organised Immune Repertoires"

Thu, Dec 12, 2019, 4:00 pm

The immune system is composed of a large number of heterogenous interacting components that collectively recognize and clear pathogens.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Steve Cowley, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, "Driving Down the Cost of Fusion Power Through Technical Innovation"

Thu, Dec 5, 2019, 4:00 pm

The National Academy has recently called for the US to adopt a strategy to produce fusion electricity from a compact pilot plant by mid-century. This approach requires innovations in technology (e.g. magnet systems and power handling systems) and innovations in physics.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Michal Lipson, Columbia University, "The Revolution of Silicon Photonics" Jadwin A-10

Thu, Nov 21, 2019, 4:00 pm

We are now experiencing a revolution in optical technologies, where one can print and control massive optical circuits, on a microelectronic chip. This revolution is enabling a whole range of applications that are in need for scalable optical technologies and it is opening the door to areas that only a decade ago were unimaginable.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Michelle Simmons, University of New South Wales, Australia, "Atomic Qubits in Silicon"

Thu, Nov 14, 2019, 4:00 pm

Building a quantum computer in the highly manufacturable material silicon offers many advantages. Phosphorus atom qubits in silicon in particular have demonstrated extremely long (up to 35 s) coherence times with >99.9% fidelity.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Sheperd S. Doeleman, Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian, "The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole"

Thu, Nov 7, 2019, 4:00 pm

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Allan H. MacDonald, University of Texas at Austin, "Magic Angle Twisted Bilayer Graphene" Jadwin A10

Thu, Oct 3, 2019, 4:00 pm

Moiré patterns are ubiquitous in layered van der Waals materials and can now be fabricated with considerable control by combining mechanical exfoliation of van der Waals layers with tear and stack device fabrication techniques.  I will explain why the electronic and optical properties of two-dimensional semiconductors and semimetals are...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
Speaker(s):

Hamilton Colloquium Series, Adam Burrows, Princeton University, "Supernova Explosion Simulations in Three Dimensions" Jadwin A10

Thu, Sep 26, 2019, 4:00 pm

Using our state-of-the-art code Fornax we have simulated the collapse and explosion of the cores of many massive-star models in three spatial dimensions.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Gerard 't Hooft, Utrecht University, "The Quantum Black Hole: How Exotic Physics May Enter"

Thu, Sep 19, 2019, 4:00 pm

Quantising a black hole can be done starting with conventional physics. We just assume matter to keep the form of point particles until they come close to the horizon. The gravitational back reaction of these particles generates a novel relation between particles going in and particles going out, enabling us to transform in-going particles into...

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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Hamilton Colloquium Series, Silviu Pufu, Princeton University "Conformal Field Theory: From Boiling Water to Quantum Gravity"

Thu, Sep 12, 2019, 4:00 pm

Conformal Field Theory (CFT) is a framework used to describe physical systems with no intrinsic length or energy scales.  CFTs have wide applicability across theoretical physics, ranging from critical points in the phase diagrams of water or magnetic materials to the low-energy dynamics of extended objects in string theory.

Audience: A free lecture open to the public.
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