Events Archive

Biophysics Seminar

Biophysics Seminar - Eleni Katifori, U. Penn "Emerging hierarchies in biological distribution networks'

Mon, Dec 14, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Biological transport webs, such as the blood circulatory system in the brain and other animal organs, or the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, are frequently dominated by dense sets of nested cycles. The architecture of these networks, as defined by the topology and edge weights, determines how efficiently the networks perform their function.

Biophysics Seminar - Long Cai, Caltech “Single cell mRNA profiling in situ by sequential FISH (seqFISH)”

Mon, Dec 7, 2015, 12:00 pm to Mon, Sep 21, 2015, 1:00 pm
We have recently demonstrated a technology using sequential hybridization and single molecule FISH to multiplex a large number of mRNA molecules directly in single cells in complex tissue samples. mRNAs in cells are barcoded by sequential rounds of hybridization, imaging, and probe stripping.

Biophysics Seminar - Long Cai, Caltech “Single cell mRNA profiling in situ by sequential FISH (seqFISH)”

Mon, Dec 7, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
We have recently demonstrated a technology using sequential hybridization and single molecule FISH to multiplex a large number of mRNA molecules directly in single cells in complex tissue samples. mRNAs in cells are barcoded by sequential rounds of hybridization, imaging, and probe stripping.

Biophysics Seminar - Oskar Hallatschek, Berkeley "The role of chance in the survival of the fittest”

Mon, Nov 30, 2015, 12:00 pm to Mon, Sep 21, 2015, 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Oskar Hallatschek, Berkeley "The role of chance in the survival of the fittest”

Biophysics Seminar - Sander Tans, AMOLF “Stochasticity and homeostasis in cellular growth”

Mon, Nov 23, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Alan Perelson, LANL “Advancing the cure of HIV through modeling.”

Mon, Nov 16, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:30

Biophysics Seminar - Lani Wu, UCSF School of Pharmacy “Reverse engineering neutrophil polarity network”

Mon, Nov 9, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
A central question in biology is how complex, spatial-temporal cellular behaviors arise from biochemical networks. Much work has led to the identification and cataloguing of various network architectures, and the explication of how static network motifs can give rise to dynamic response characteristics, including ultrasensitive, switch-like, and...

Biophysics Seminar - Frank Vollmer, Max Planck Institute "Exploring the Nanoscale Dynamics of Molecular Systems with Optical Microcavities"

Mon, Oct 26, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Medicine as well as biology increasingly rely on the use of cutting‐edge physics and engineering, in order to pursue the next generation nanomedical applications and to address fundamental questions in the life sciences.

Biophysics Seminar - Matthias Kaschube, FIAS “Spontaneous and sensory-driven neural activity across space and time”

Mon, Oct 19, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Spontaneous activity is ubiquitous in cortex, but its role in the assembly and maintenance of cortical circuits is unclear at present. Novel chronic recording techniques enable following neural population activity over long periods of time.

Biophysics Seminar - Paul A. Wiggins, U.Washington “Visualization of replication conflicts and other stories of life at a molecular scale.”

Mon, Oct 12, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Cell proliferation requires timely and reliable DNA replication. Genetic and biochemical evidence reveals that the replication process is subject to a variety of conflict mechanisms, including DNA damage, concurrent DNA transcription, and DNA-bound protein complexes which can all act to stall the replication process.

Biophysics Seminar - Manu Prakash, Stanford “Life in Flatland: Complex morphogenetic and behavioral traits of a simple basal metazoan.”

Biophysics Seminar - Marcelo Magnasco, Rockefeller University

Mon, Sep 28, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
"Balancing on an edge: dynamical criticality as a biological strategy for flexibility and integration.

Biophysics Seminar - Anatoly B. Kolomeisky, Rice "How to Understand Mechanism of Protein Search for Targets on DNA"

Mon, Sep 21, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
One of the most critical aspects of protein functioning in cells is the ability of protein molecules to quickly find and recognize specific targets on DNA. Kinetic measurements indicate that in many cases the corresponding association rates are surprisingly large.

Biophysics Seminar - Jonathan Howard, Yale - “Ciliary and flagellar motility: From single molecules to collective motion"

Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Cilia and flagella are slender cellular appendages that have motile, sensory and regulatory roles. They drive the movement of cells through fluids, thereby powering the swimming of spermatozoa and ciliated microorganisms, and they drive the movement of fluid past cells, thereby generating fluid and mucus flows in the airways, reproductive tracts...

Biophysics Seminar - Nikta Fakhri, MIT - "TBA"

Mon, Apr 13, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch @ 11:45, talk @ 12pm.

Biophysics Seminar - Marc Gershow, NYU - "TBA"

Mon, Apr 6, 2015, 1:00 pm

Lunch @ 11:45, talk @ 12pm.

Biophysics Seminar - Sidhartha Goyal, U. Toronto - “Finding the rules of blood regeneration”

Mon, Mar 30, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Much of complex biology results from interactions among a large number of individually simpler elements. Blood regeneration is no different. About 100 billion new blood cells are made everyday from a much smaller yet a large population of diverse stem cell population.

Biophysics Seminar - Michael Levin, Tufts - “Endogenous voltage gradients among non-neural tissues encode large-scale patterning cues in embryogenes

Mon, Mar 23, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
The big challenge in modern biology is to understand and control the mechanisms by which living organisms organize, maintain, remodel, and restore their shape.

Biophysics Seminar - Dan Larson, NIH - "Single-molecule imaging reveals switch between spurious and functional ncRNA transcription"

Mon, Mar 9, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
In recent years, through parallel advances in microscopy, fluorescent probe development, and computational modeling, it has become possible to describe gene expression in a fundamentally different way: one can now directly observe single molecules of RNA in living and fixed cells using the fluorescence microscope.

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