Events Archive

Biophysics Seminar

Biophysics Seminar speaker Olga Dudko, UCSD

Mon, Sep 19, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
"How do distant DNA segments find each other? From trajectories to principles to testable predictions”.
Lunch @ 11:45, seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Sandeep Robert Datta, Harvard "Linking Sensation to Action in the Olfactory System"

Mon, Apr 25, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
The Datta lab studies how information from the outside world is detected, encoded in the brain, and transformed into meaningful behavioral outputs. We address this fundamental problem by characterizing the olfactory system, the sensory system used by most animals to interact with their environment.

Biophysics Seminar - John F. Brady, Caltech "The Swim Pressure of Active Matter"

Mon, Apr 18, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
One of the distinguishing features of many living systems is their ability to move, to self-propel, to be active. Through their motion, either voluntarily or involuntarily, living systems are able self-assemble: birds flock, fish school, bacteria swarm, etc. But such behavior is not limited to living systems.

Biophysics Seminar - Polly Fordyce, Stanford

Mon, Apr 11, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch @ 11:45, seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Thierry Mora, ENS

Mon, Mar 21, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch @ 11:45, seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Nicolas Desprat, ENS "The morphogenesis of bacterial microcolonies and its role in environmental adaptation"

Mon, Mar 7, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
To colonize surfaces, bacteria must adhere and proliferate. How those terms compete to shape the foundations of biofilm is barely understood. When bacteria grow between a coverslip and a gel pad, they form microcolonies, which develop initially in a plane before terraces establish at their centre.

Biophysics Seminar - Michelle Wang, Cornell "Single molecule mechanics – towards high throughput"

Mon, Feb 29, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Our lab focuses on mechanical studies of fundamental biological processes in biology: transcription and replication. These are highly dynamic processes that are carried out by molecular motors that translocate along, and rotate around, DNA.

Biophysics Seminar - Jason Swedlow, University of Dundee "Signalling and mechanics in the human mitotic spindle and the DNA damage response."

Mon, Feb 22, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
A hallmark of mitosis in mammalian cells is the alignment of chromosomes into a thin metaphase plate.

Biophysics Seminar - Alexandra Zidovska, NYU "Mechanism and Function of Chromatin Positional Dynamics in Interphase"

Mon, Feb 1, 2016, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood. In interphase, time between two cell divisions, chromatin fills the cell nucleus in its minimally condensed polymeric state. Chromatin serves as substrate to a number of biological processes, e.g. gene expression and DNA replication, which require it to...

Biophysics Seminar - Eleni Katifori, U. Penn "Emerging hierarchies in biological distribution networks'

Mon, Dec 14, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Biological transport webs, such as the blood circulatory system in the brain and other animal organs, or the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, are frequently dominated by dense sets of nested cycles. The architecture of these networks, as defined by the topology and edge weights, determines how efficiently the networks perform their function.

Biophysics Seminar - Long Cai, Caltech “Single cell mRNA profiling in situ by sequential FISH (seqFISH)”

Mon, Dec 7, 2015, 12:00 pm to Mon, Sep 21, 2015, 1:00 pm
We have recently demonstrated a technology using sequential hybridization and single molecule FISH to multiplex a large number of mRNA molecules directly in single cells in complex tissue samples. mRNAs in cells are barcoded by sequential rounds of hybridization, imaging, and probe stripping.

Biophysics Seminar - Long Cai, Caltech “Single cell mRNA profiling in situ by sequential FISH (seqFISH)”

Mon, Dec 7, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
We have recently demonstrated a technology using sequential hybridization and single molecule FISH to multiplex a large number of mRNA molecules directly in single cells in complex tissue samples. mRNAs in cells are barcoded by sequential rounds of hybridization, imaging, and probe stripping.

Biophysics Seminar - Oskar Hallatschek, Berkeley "The role of chance in the survival of the fittest”

Mon, Nov 30, 2015, 12:00 pm to Mon, Sep 21, 2015, 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Oskar Hallatschek, Berkeley "The role of chance in the survival of the fittest”

Biophysics Seminar - Sander Tans, AMOLF “Stochasticity and homeostasis in cellular growth”

Mon, Nov 23, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:00

Biophysics Seminar - Alan Perelson, LANL “Advancing the cure of HIV through modeling.”

Mon, Nov 16, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm

Lunch@ 11:45, Seminar 12-1:30

Biophysics Seminar - Lani Wu, UCSF School of Pharmacy “Reverse engineering neutrophil polarity network”

Mon, Nov 9, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
A central question in biology is how complex, spatial-temporal cellular behaviors arise from biochemical networks. Much work has led to the identification and cataloguing of various network architectures, and the explication of how static network motifs can give rise to dynamic response characteristics, including ultrasensitive, switch-like, and...

Biophysics Seminar - Frank Vollmer, Max Planck Institute "Exploring the Nanoscale Dynamics of Molecular Systems with Optical Microcavities"

Mon, Oct 26, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Medicine as well as biology increasingly rely on the use of cutting‐edge physics and engineering, in order to pursue the next generation nanomedical applications and to address fundamental questions in the life sciences.

Biophysics Seminar - Matthias Kaschube, FIAS “Spontaneous and sensory-driven neural activity across space and time”

Mon, Oct 19, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Spontaneous activity is ubiquitous in cortex, but its role in the assembly and maintenance of cortical circuits is unclear at present. Novel chronic recording techniques enable following neural population activity over long periods of time.

Biophysics Seminar - Paul A. Wiggins, U.Washington “Visualization of replication conflicts and other stories of life at a molecular scale.”

Mon, Oct 12, 2015, 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm
Cell proliferation requires timely and reliable DNA replication. Genetic and biochemical evidence reveals that the replication process is subject to a variety of conflict mechanisms, including DNA damage, concurrent DNA transcription, and DNA-bound protein complexes which can all act to stall the replication process.

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